Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education Compliance/Comparison Checklist

6/12/14

The National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) is pleased to announce the release of the Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education Compliance/Comparison Checklist! This is a companion document to the recently released Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education, a collection of CFOC3 standards with a specific focus on the infant and toddler population. Use it on your laptop, smartphone, or tablet!

The Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education Compliance/Comparison Checklist can be used by:

• early care and education caregivers/teachers;
• state regulators and policy makers;
• health, mental health and education consultants, trainers and other health professionals;
• parents/guardians; and
• early care and education academic degree programs.

This interactive checklist can be used on your desktop/laptop, smartphone or tablet. Be sure to save the document to your device in order to use the interactive features. You can conduct an assessment of a program’s health and safety practices for infant and toddlers over time, saving your work as you go!

Source: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education

Available at: http://nrckids.org/default/assets/File/Products/Infant%20and%20Toddler/Infant-ToddlerCompliance_Comparison%20Checklist_FINAL.pdf

Tips for Keeping Children Safe: A Developmental Guide – Head Start

5/14

Children grow rapidly in their first five years of life, constantly acquiring new skills and knowledge. When caregivers know what children are able to do, as well what injuries may occur at each stage of development, they can set up safe environments and supervise children to protect them from injury.1

This developmental tool provides safety tips for early childhood staff working with young children in classroom environments. You will find a description of each stage of development and a list of daily routines for children within four age groups: infants, mobile infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Some safety tips, such as active supervision, apply to all children. Others address the developmental needs of children in a specific age group.

Be sure to review the safety tips for each age group if there are children in your classroom at more than one developmental level, such as infants and mobile infants or mobile infants and toddlers.

Source: Head Start National Center on Health and Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/hhsgrantsforecast/index.cfm?switch=grant.view&gff_grants_forecastInfoID=70262

Health and Safety Checklist for Early Care and Education Programs: Based on Caring for Our Children National Health and Safety Performance Standards – Third Edition

4/2014

The Health and Safety Checklist is a 112-item tool developed to assess key health and safety standards and identify ways to improve health and safety in early care and education (ECE) programs. The Checklist includes 72 out of the 138 key health and safety standards in Stepping Stones Third Edition. The Checklist was reviewed by an advisory committee of health and safety experts and pilot tested by child care health consultants. The Checklist is user-friendly, easy-to-understand and has links to the Caring for Our Children standards and other related resources. It can be used on a computer, electronic tablet or smart phone or printed on paper and filled out by hand. The User Manual provides background information and guidelines for rating each item.

Source: California Childcare Health Program

Available at: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org/html/pandr/formsmain.htm#hscr

Should You Put Sunscreen on Infants? Not Usually

2/10/2014

You’re at the beach, slathered in sunscreen. Your 5-month-old baby is there, too. Should you put sunscreen on her? Not usually, according to Hari Cheryl Sachs, M.D., a pediatrician at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun,” Sachs says, “and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV) rays are most intense.”

Sunscreens are recommended for children and adults. What makes babies so different?

“Babies’ skin is less mature compared to adults, and infants have a higher surface-area to body-weight ratio compared to older children and adults.” explains Sachs. “Both these factors mean that an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens may be much greater, increasing the risk of side effects from the sunscreen.”

“The best protection is to keep your baby in the shade, if possible,” Sachs says. “If there’s no natural shade, create your own with an umbrella or the canopy of the stroller.”

“If there’s no way to keep an infant out of the sun, you should check with your pediatrician about what to do for your baby.” If your pediatrician agrees, you can apply a small amount of sunscreen—with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15—to small areas such as the cheeks and back of the hands. Sachs suggests testing your baby’s sensitivity to sunscreen by first trying a small amount on the inner wrist.

Source: Food and Drug Administration

Available at: http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm309136.htm

Home Safety Webinar

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
2:30 – 3:45 p.m. EST
Register Now!

Join the Head Start National Center on Health (NCH) for a webinar on home safety. It will provide staff with information on safety risks and injury prevention tips for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Explore some home safety checklists that families and staff can complete together. Participants also will learn some new ways to engage families in a conversation about injury prevention.

Topics for this webinar include:

  • Identifying common injuries among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers
  • Exploring ways to engage families around home safety
  • Reviewing sample home safety checklists
  • Reviewing injury prevention strategies

Who Should Participate?

This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: Head Start and Early Head Start home visitors, child development supervisors, education managers, health managers, and family services staff.

How to Register

Participation is free. Select this link to register: https://goto.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1032099

After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with information on how to join the webinar on Tuesday, April 15. This presentation will be recorded and archived on the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center (ECLKC) for later viewing.

Certificate of Participation

Participants will receive a certificate of participation upon completion on an online evaluation. A link to the evaluation will be available when the webinar closes. Participants must complete it in order to receive a certificate. Only participants in the live presentation will be eligible.

Questions?

For more information, contact NCH at nchinfo@aap.org or toll-free at 1-888-227-5125.

 

Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education (I/T)-National Resource Center

The National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) is pleased to announce the release of Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education (I/T).

I/T is a collection of 232 nationally recognized health and safety standards applicable to the infant and toddler population in early care and education settings. These materials and the associated 11 Appendices are a subset of materials available in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards; Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd Edition (CFOC3). These materials have been selected for inclusion because they are of particular relevance to the care of the youngest children.

This valuable resource was developed with our collaborative partners, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Public Health Association (APHA), as well as 41 stakeholders representing 34 organizations who reviewed and validated the chosen standards. Support for this project was provided through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The intended audiences for this document are:

  • Early care and education caregivers/teachers who can implement these strategies to provide a safe and healthy environments for infants and toddlers in early care and education settings, while simultaneously supporting and partnering with families during this critical stage of development;
  • State regulators and policy makers who can promote the adoption of these standards in this collection in their state licensing standards in an effort to promote best practices within programs that serve the infant/toddler population;
  • Health, mental health and education consultants, infant/toddler specialists, trainers and other health professionals who can promote these standards to early care and education caregivers/teachers;
  • Parents/guardians who can access and petition the use of these standards in their child’s early care and education setting; and
  • Early care and education academic degree program administrators who can enhance their infant/toddler curriculum.

Source: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC)

Available at: http://nrckids.org/index.cfm/products/caring-for-infants-and-toddlers-in-early-care-and-education-it/

Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education (I/T)-National Resource Center

3/2104

The National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) is pleased to announce the release of Caring for Infants and Toddlers in Early Care and Education (I/T).

I/T is a collection of 232 nationally recognized health and safety standards applicable to the infant and toddler population in early care and education settings. These materials and the associated 11 Appendices are a subset of materials available in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards; Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd Edition (CFOC3). These materials have been selected for inclusion because they are of particular relevance to the care of the youngest children.

This valuable resource was developed with our collaborative partners, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Public Health Association (APHA), as well as 41 stakeholders representing 34 organizations who reviewed and validated the chosen standards. Support for this project was provided through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The intended audiences for this document are:

  • Early care and education caregivers/teachers who can implement these strategies to provide a safe and healthy environments for infants and toddlers in early care and education settings, while simultaneously supporting and partnering with families during this critical stage of development;
  • State regulators and policy makers who can promote the adoption of these standards in this collection in their state licensing standards in an effort to promote best practices within programs that serve the infant/toddler population;
  • Health, mental health and education consultants, infant/toddler specialists, trainers and other health professionals who can promote these standards to early care and education caregivers/teachers;
  • Parents/guardians who can access and petition the use of these standards in their child’s early care and education setting; and
  • Early care and education academic degree program administrators who can enhance their infant/toddler curriculum.

Source: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education

Available at: http://nrckids.org/index.cfm/products/caring-for-infants-and-toddlers-in-early-care-and-education-it/

Some metallic toys, low-cost jewelry present health risks for young children

3/5/2014

We know that babies and young children often put non-food items in their mouths, a behavior that occasionally leads to swallowing of foreign objects. Metallic toys and low-cost jewelry often contain toxic substances such as lead and cadmium. Do these objects present a health risk for young children? “We observed that cadmium and lead contamination, both very toxic metals, are a major problem, especially when it comes to metallic jewelry and toys. Copper, nickel, arsenic and antimony were also present in some samples,” explains the author of a new article.

Source: Science Daily

Available at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140305125241.htm

EHS Tip Sheet No. 45: Can Early Head Start Programs Use High Chairs and Other Child-Sized Feeding Chairs? – Head Start

Tip Sheet No. 45 offers considerations for using feeding chairs within various Early Head Start program settings. Grantee and program administrators may use this resource as a guide when program planning. Applicable Program Performance Standards and resources provide more information.

Source: Early Head Start National Resource Center/Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc/Early%20Head%20Start/health-safety-nutrition/safety/tipsheet45.htm?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=New%20Content%20for%20September&utm_content=New%20Content%20for%20September+CID_17b263f247fc16433932b2158bd29cdc&utm_source=CM%20Eblast&utm_term=EHS%20Tip%20Sheet%20No%2045%20Can%20Early%20Head%20Start%20Programs%20Use%20High%20Chairs%20and%20Other%20Child-Sized%20Feeding%20Chairs%20REVISED

Keeping Kids Safe – Head Start

9/2013

Transportation is one of the most vital services Head Start and Early Head Start programs provide. The highest need families are typically the least likely to have access to transportation. They rarely own a vehicle and may have no access to public transportation, either because of location or lack of fare. Sometimes, even when public transportation is available and they have the fare, it is not a reasonable way to get to and from Head Start. Multiple young children, crowded routes, and unpredictable schedules can make it more difficult.

Transportation staff serve an incredibly important role. For many children, they are the first part of each Head Start day. Not only do they make sure the buses are safe and that routes run on time, staff also supervise and engage children on their bus. Positive interactions with transportation staff can set the course of a child’s day, making them feel safe and nurtured.

Source: Office of Head Start

Available at: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/hs/director/blog/keeping-kids-safe.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=New%20Content%20e-blast%20for%20August&utm_content=New%20Content%20e-blast%20for%20August+CID_c338e8624166a79d4b527a9e1bec9751&utm_source=CM%20Eblast&utm_term=Keeping%20Kids%20Safe