Head Start Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness: Volume Two: Native and Heritage Language Preservation, Revitalization, and Maintenance (2nd Ed.) Resource Catalogue

Head Start is more ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse than ever before. The Office of Head Start (OHS) is dedicated to providing all Head Start programs with resources to meet the diverse needs of their communities. This resource catalogue (volumes one, two, and three) is designed to provide programs with evidence-based materials, research, promising practices, and other information to help develop culturally and linguistically responsive systems and services. The catalogue includes books, articles, videos, and other useful resources—most of which are available free of charge.

The resource catalogue is organized into three volumes, each with a special focus. A few resources are included in more than one volume, but most are not.

  • Volume One: Dual Language Learning provides information to support Head Start programs working to maximize the development and potential of dual language learners (DLLs) and their families. Catalogue entries showcase resources and practices on topics such as teaching strategies, assessment of DLLs, and supporting culturally and linguistically diverse programs.
  • Volume Two: Native and Heritage Language Preservation, Revitalization, and Maintenance provides information to support Head Start programs working to preserve, revitalize, and/or reclaim American Indian, Alaskan Native, Pacific Island, and other heritage languages. Catalogue entries showcase resources and practices on topics such as early childhood language nests, the use of technology in language learning, immersion preschool programs, and culturally responsive curricula.
  • Volume Three: Cultural Responsiveness provides information to support Head Start programs in developing culturally competent and responsive practices. Catalogue entries showcase resources and practices on topics such as culturally responsive teaching strategies, working with culturally diverse families and communities, and infusing family cultures across the curriculum.

Source: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center/National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/cultural-linguistic/docs/resource-catalogue-main-book-4.pdf

Incorporación de temas culturales para promover el pensamiento analítico en niños de edad preescolar de programas Head Start para indios estadounidenses – Head Start

Conectar con las tradiciones culturales mejora las oportunidades que tienen los padres de participar en su rol como primeros maestros de sus hijos. Los equipos docentes, inclusive los padres y las familias pueden obtener un entendimiento de la manera en que las experiencias culturalmente pertinentes en una reserva india mejora las oportunidades que tienen los niños para desarrollar habilidades de pensar críticamente y resolver problemas. Este recurso ofrece pasos para diseñar una unidad, basada en la investigación, puede adaptarse a cualquier comunidad.

Source: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/Espanol/Niños%20que%20aprenden%20en%20dos%20idiomas%20%28DLL%29%20y%20sus%20familias/Incorporacinde.htm

Examining American Indian perspectives in the Central Region on parent involvement in children’s education

This study examines American Indian parents’ perceptions of parent involve- ment in their children’s education and factors that may encourage or discour- age involvement.

A better understanding of American Indian parent involvement was considered as a pos- sible solution to narrow the achievement gap for American Indian students. Five focus groups, consisting of 47 self-selected parents, were conducted in one state in the Central Region. Factors perceived to encourage parent involvement included a caring, supportive, and communicative school staff and cultur- ally respectful environment; access to Ameri- can Indian programs, resource centers, after school activities, and clubs; and the presence of an advocate or liaison in each school. Fac- tors perceived to discourage parent involve- ment included feeling unwelcome or intimi- dated at the school and perceptions of racism and discrimination; experiencing scheduling, transportation, childcare, and financial dif- ficulties; and having prior negative experiences in their own or their children’s education.

Statement from Secretary Sebelius on National Native American Heritage Month

11/7/11

This month we celebrate National Native American Heritage Month, to honor American Indians and Alaska Natives who have contributed a great deal to our country.  I recently had the opportunity to visit Indian Country in Alaska and I can say first hand that Native Americans are passionate, determined people who play a momentous role in enriching the spirit of our Nation.

They are among some of America’s most significant authors, artists, scientists, and political leaders. And they have fought to protect this country as members of our Armed Forces. Native Americans have long demonstrated their commitment to advancing the common goals of this Nation, and we honor their resolve in the face of years of marginalization and broken promises.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Available at: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2011pres/11/20111107a.html

Assistance for Native American Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

10/28/11

Ah, yes—the pitter-patter of little feet around the house. Then they grow up, move out, and start a family of their own with grandkids for grandparents to enjoy and spoil before handing them back to their parents.

That’s the ideal world concept abruptly interrupted by real world reality as more and more grandparents assume the responsibility of raising another generation—the children of their children.

Source: Indian Country Today

Available at: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/10/assistance-for-native-american-grandparents-raising-grandchildren/

Head Start Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness Resource Catalogue

Head Start is more ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse than ever before. The Office of Head Start (OHS) is dedicated to providing all Head Start programs with resources to meet the diverse needs of their communities. The Resource Catalogue is designed to provide programs with evidence-based materials, research, promising practices, and other resources to help develop culturally and linguistically responsive systems and services. The catalogue includes books, articles, videos, and other useful resources—many of which are available free of charge.

Volume Two of the Resource Catalogue provides information to support Head Start programs working to preserve, revitalize, and/or reclaim heritage languages, such as American Indian, Native Alaskan, Pacific Islanders, and other groups aiming to preserve a heritage language. Catalogue entries showcase resources and practices on topics such as early childhood language nests, the use of technology in language learning, immersion preschool programs, and culturally responsive curricula.

Source: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/cultural-linguistic/docs/resource-catalogue-main-book-3.pdf

Understanding Urban Indians’ Interactions with ACF Programs and Services

8/10/11

As part of the “Understanding Urban Indians’ Interactions with ACF Programs and Services” research study, site visits will be conducted to three to five urban areas with a high percentage of Indians within the population, including Anchorage, Alaska. Members of the research study team will utilize a field discussion guide to collect information from staff members at relevant programs and organizations (e.g., American Indian Organizations, social service agencies serving urban Indians) in these areas.

The goal of this information collection is to assess the challenges and context for family self-sufficiency of urban Indians and their interactions with services and programs offered by ACF.

The information gathered will help to generate recommendations and action items for ACF in seeking to better understand and meet the needs of the urban Indian population.

Source: Federal Register, Volume 76 Issue 154

Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-10/html/2011-20069.htm

Understanding Urban Indians’ Interactions with ACF Programs and Services

8/10/11

As part of the “Understanding Urban Indians’ Interactions with ACF Programs and Services” research study, site visits will be conducted to three to five urban areas with a high percentage of Indians within the population, including Anchorage, Alaska. Members of the research study team will utilize a field discussion guide to collect information from staff members at relevant programs and organizations (e.g., American Indian Organizations, social service agencies serving urban Indians) in these areas.

The goal of this information collection is to assess the challenges and context for family self-sufficiency of urban Indians and their interactions with services and programs offered by ACF.

The information gathered will help to generate recommendations and action items for ACF in seeking to better understand and meet the needs of the urban Indian population.

Source: Federal Register, Volume 76 Issue 154

Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-10/html/2011-20069.htm

Tribal Consultation Meetings

Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs. The purpose of these Consultation Sessions is to discuss ways to better meet the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting the delivery of Head Start services in their geographic locations [42 U.S.C. 9835, Section 640(l)(4)].

Source: Federal Register, Volume 76 Issue 153 (Tuesday, August 9, 2011).

Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-09/html/2011-20071.htm

Notice to 10 Expansion Supplement Awards to implement the First Lady’s Let’s Move! in Indian Country (LMIC) initiative

7/21/11

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Administration for Native Americans (ANA), announces the award of ten expansion supplement awards to Native American Tribes that are currently combating the epidemic of health issues in Native America. Expansion supplement funds will support activities associated with the First Lady’s initiative, Let’s Move! in Indian Country. Under the program, grantee Tribes have set forth goals and milestones that will benefit Native youth, children, and families.

Source: Federal Register

Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-21/html/2011-18377.htm