The Food Friends: Encouraging Preschoolers to Try New Foods

5/2006

Most children are naturally picky eaters. Teachers and caregivers can help children overcome their picky eating by allowing them to explore and taste new foods. With the rise in childhood overweight, it is important that we establish healthful eating habits early in life. One way to do this is to encourage young children to try new foods. The preschool years are a critical time to introduce and encourage healthy nutrition because early exposure to healthful foods helps children establish good eating habits that carry into adulthood (Birch 1998).

Unfortunately, the diets of most young children are poor or need improvement. Children’s diets typically mirror the deficiencies of their parents’ diets—high in fat, sodium, and sugar and low in fiber. In a Nutrition Insights report (USDA 2001), only 36 percent of two- to three-year-olds were noted as having a good diet, and this percent- age decreased with increasing age. Much of the decline in diet quality for children occurred between the two- to three-year-old age groups and the four- to six-year-old groups, falling from 36 to 17 percent.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/Food_Friends.pdf?utm_source=July+2013+Newsletter%3A+Children+in+the+Culinary+Environment&utm_campaign=July+2013+Newsletter&utm_medium=email

What the Research Says: Gender-Typed Toys

The holiday season is a time of year when many families and programs are thinking about new toys. But what makes a good toy for a young child? NAEYC asked one researcher about what her work tells us about toys, children, and play.

Judith Elaine Blakemore is professor of psychology and associate dean of Arts and Sciences for Faculty Development at Indiana University−Purdue University in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Her primary research interest is the development of gender roles.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/content/what-research-says-gender-typed-toys

NAEYC Cyber Monday Sale: 50% Off Select Titles | National Association for the Education of Young Children

We’re having an online sale on Cyber Monday, November 28, 2011. From 12:01 a.m. on Monday, November 28 to 12:01 a.m. on Tuesday, November 29 you can get 50% off the titles below! The sale is only good for items in stock—once the book is gone the sale is over for that title.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/cyber-monday

Teachers Lounge – NAEYC

Respond to the current Teachers’ Lounge question, suggest a question for a future issue, or look through past questions to and from preschool teachers.

If we publish your question, you will receive a $50 gift certificate to purchase NAEYC resources. If we publish your response, you will receive a $50 gift certificate to Gryphon House. A special thank you to Gryphon House, a publisher of early childhood books and e-books for teachers and parents and the sponsor of this column.

Call 800-638-0928 or visit their website for more information.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/tyc/lounge

NEXT for Young Children

9/2011

NEXT for Young Children suggests ways to build on the content of selected articles from Young Children, the award-winning, peer-reviewed professional journal published bimonthly by NAEYC. The training outlines for these arti- cles can be used in a variety of ways: teacher educators can use them in their classes; staff development specialists can use them to design trainings; and center directors and school principals can use them to plan staff meetings or training sessions. Early childhood education students and practitioners may also wish to use them alone or with colleagues or peers.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/201109/NEXT%20YC0911.pdf

Trend Briefs: Assessment of Child Progress Accreditation of Programs for Young Children Standard 4

The appropriate utilization of assessments has long been at the heart of effective early childhood education programs. The National Association for the Educa- tion of Young Children (NAEYC) and National Association of Early Child- hood Specialists in State Departments of Education (NAECS/SDE) position statement on curriculum, instruction, and assessment underscores the need for a systemic, integrated approach for linking assessments with curriculum and instruction.1 This approach was endorsed and furthered by the Nation- al Academies of Science panel on early childhood assessment,2 which stated explicitly “. . . that a primary purpose of assessing children or classrooms is to improve the quality of early child- hood care and education by identify- ing where more support, professional development, or funding is needed and by providing classroom personnel tools to track children’s growth and ad- just instruction (p. 10).” As such, align- ing assessments with curriculum and instruction ensures that the intended outcomes are addressed and monitored, while misaligned systems cannot ensure that intentions are being met.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Available at: http://www.naeyc.org/files/academy/file/TrendBriefsStandard4.pdf

Reforming Early Education

On August 22, the Center on Children and Families at Brookings convened a group of experts and practitioners to discuss reforms of early education programs in the United States. A discussion with Dr. Steven Barnett of Rutgers on how preschool programs, including Head Start, should be reformed based on his article “Effectiveness of Early Educational Intervention” that appeared in the August 19 issue of the journal Science. Dr. Barnett’s presentation was followed by an overview of the Obama Administration’s Head Start reform agenda by Yvette Sanchez Fuentes of the Administration for Children and Families. The presentations were followed by brief reactions from Dr. Jerlean Daniel of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Dr. Jens Ludwig of the University of Chicago and Yasmina Vinci of the National Head Start Association. A panel discussion moderated by Ron Haskins, co-director of the Center on Children & Families, followed.

Source: Brookings Institution

Available at: http://www.brookings.edu/events/2011/0822_early_education.aspx