Accessible Television In The Classroom

3/2015

The potential of television as an educational tool has been widely recognized in terms of early childhood education, since the launch of Sesame Street more than 40 years ago. Television offers the same potential in primary and secondary education. Teachers and families have reported using educational TV to satisfy a variety of objectives:

  • To introduce, reinforce, and expand on content being taught.
  • To respond to a variety of learning styles.
  • To increase student motivation to learn.
  • To stimulate other learning activities.

The addition of accessibility features, such as captioning and description, increases the educational value and provides equal access. All of the programs below were made accessible through grants by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services/Office of Special Education Services. Some were part of the DCMP grant, while others were a part of five Television Access grants, awarded to Bridge Multimedia, CaptionMax, Dicapta, Narrative Television Network, and National Captioning Institute. Through a special pilot project, the Television Access grantees received approval from content partners to allow for the distribution of content to DCMP members.

Source: Described and Captioned Media Program

Available at: https://dcmp.org/accessible-television

EHS TA Paper No. 17: Individualizing Care for Infants and Toddlers – Part 2 – Head Start

6/2014

This paper is the second part of a two-part series about individualizing—or tailoring—care that meets each child and family’s interests, abilities, and needs. It focuses on the four activities of individualizing care: observe and document; reflect, interpret, and plan; implement; and reflect and evaluate. Early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start professional development staff may use this paper with teachers, family child care providers, and home visitors.In

Individualizing Care for Infants and Toddlers –Part 1, we focused on the “why” and “what” of individualization:

  • the importance of individualization;
  • some considerations for individualizing care; and
  • program structures and practices that support staff in doing this important work.

Here, in Part 2, we describe the “how” of individualizing care—the process through which staff respond thoughtfully to each child and family’s interests, abilities, and needs. We focus in particular on the central activity that includes reflecting, interpreting, and planning. We also highlight relevant Head Start Program Performance Standards and include sample planning forms, references, and related resources.

Source: Early Head Start National Resource Center and Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc/Early%20Head%20Start/early-learning/caregiving/ehs-ta-17.html

EHS TA Paper No. 16: Individualizing Care for Infants and Toddlers – Part 1 – Head Start

6/2014

This paper is the first part of a two-part series about individualizing—or tailoring—care that meets each child and family’s interests, abilities, and needs. It shares information about why individualizing care is important; some considerations for providing such care; and program structures and practices that support staff in doing this work. Early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start professional development staff may use this paper with teachers, family child care providers, and home visitors.Head Start programs serving infants and toddlers—Early Head Start EHS and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start MSHS—have an incredible opportunity to nurture very young children during one of the most formative periods of their lives. As a program leader, you have an important role in helping frontline staff—teachers, home visitors, and family child care providers—implement practices that are tailored to support the strengths and needs of each child and family. For the complete document, select Individualizing Care for Infants and Toddlers – Part 1 [PDF, 1.1MB].

Source: Early Head Start National Resource Center and Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc/Early%20Head%20Start/early-learning/caregiving/ehs-ta-16.html

Applications for New Awards; Educational Technology, Media, and Materials Program for Individuals with Disabilities-Center on Technology and Disability

Deadline: 8/15/2013

Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Educational Technology, Media, and Materials for Individuals with Disabilities Program [1] is to: (1) Improve results for children with disabilities by promoting the development, demonstration, and use of technology; (2) support educational media services activities designed to be of educational value in the classroom for children with disabilities; (3) provide support for captioning and video description that is appropriate for use in the classroom; and (4) provide accessible educational materials to children with disabilities in a timely manner.

Priority: In accordance with 34 CFR 75.105(b)(2)(v), this priority is from allowable activities specified in the statute (see sections 674(b)(1), 674(b)(2)(A), and 681(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.)).

Absolute Priority: For FY 2013, this priority is an absolute priority. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet this priority.

Source: Federal Register

Available at: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/07/01/2013-15712/applications-for-new-awards-educational-technology-media-and-materials-program-for-individuals-with

Activity Matrix: Organizing Learning Throughout the Day – Head Start

6/2013

This in-service suite introduces the activity matrix as an effective tool for teachers to organize learning opportunities for children who need additional support during daily classroom activities and routines.

Source: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/center/practice/ISS/organize.html

The Landscape of Medical Care for Children with Medical Complexity (Association Special Report)

June 2013

This special report looks at a growing sub-population among children — the medically complex — and reveals the extent and cost of their health services utilization. It also examines where there are gaps in how the care is managed, and identifies opportunities for improvement. This report is supported by the Children’s Hospital Association.

Source: National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI) and National Association of Children’s Hospitals (NACH)

Available at: http://www.childrenshospitals.net/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home3&TEMPLATE=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&CONTENTID=66925

EHS TA Paper No. 15: Observation: The Heart of Individualizing Responsive Care

2013

This paper supports staff in Early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs who provide professional development. It offers information on observation as well as strategies to support and strengthen this important component of quality infant and toddler care. Use this resource with teachers, family child care providers, and home visitors who work with infants, toddlers, and their families.

Observation informs individualization. It is the first step in providing the kind of individualized, responsive care for infants and toddlers that builds relationships, supports attachment, and promotes healthy brain development. Because individualization cannot happen without observation, this technical assistance paper focuses on observation:

  • What it is
  • Why it is important
  • What to observe
  • How to observe and document
  • How to set up observation systems
  • Reviewing and reflecting on observation information

Source: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center

Available at: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/ehsnrc/docs/ehs-ta-paper-15-observation.pdf