Characteristics of Center-based Early Care and Education Programs: Initial Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) 

This technical report uses new, nationally representative data—The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—to describe the current landscape of center-based early care and education (ECE) programs in this country. The NSECE includes 4 surveys, and the survey used here, the NSECE Center-based Provider Survey, gathered data from directors or other instructional leaders of center-based early care and education programs (ECE) serving children birth through age 5 years, not yet in kindergarten.  This report is based on data from 7,770 Center-based Provider questionnaires.  The 129,000 center-based programs described here serve 6.98 million children birth through age five years not yet in kindergarten.  ECE programs are described by such key characteristics as enrollment size, ages of children served, auspice, revenue sources, and sponsorship and hours of operation.

Source: Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families

Available at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/characteristics-of-center-based-early-care-and-education-programs-initial-findings-from-the-national-survey-of-early

Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014

7/26/2013

This notice announces the annual adjustments to the national average payment rates for meals and snacks served in child care centers, outside-school-hours care centers, at-risk after school care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals and snacks served in day care homes; and the administrative reimbursement rates for sponsoring organizations of day care homes, to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index. Further adjustments are made to these rates to reflect the higher costs of providing meals in the States of Alaska and Hawaii. The adjustments contained in this notice are made on an annual basis each July, as required by the laws and regulations governing the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

Source: Federal Register, Volume 78 Issue 144

Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-07-26/html/2013-17991.htm

The early childhood care and education workforce in the United States: Understanding changes from 1990 through 2010

7/2013

Despite heightened policy interest in improving the quality of the early childhood care and education (ECCE) workforce, very little is known about the characteristics of this workforce or the extent to which these characteristics have changed over time. Using nationally-representative data, this paper fills this gap by documenting changes between 1990-2010 in the educational attainment, compensation and turnover of the ECCE workforce overall and within each of the three sectors that compose it: centers, homes and schools. We find that average educational attainment and compensation of ECCE workers, as well as the prestige of those entering the workforce, increased substantially over the period studied, and that turnover decreased. We also document a major shift in the composition of the ECCE workforce towards center-based settings and away from home-based settings. Although this shift towards more regulated settings provides one plausible explanation for the overall improvements, we actually find that the improvements in the characteristics of the ECCE workforce were primarily driven by changes within each of the sectors rather than by the shift away from home-based settings towards centers. Further, we show that the home-based workforce exhibited the most profound changes over the period examined.

Source: Center for Education Policy Analysis

Available at: http://cepa.stanford.edu/content/early-childhood-care-and-education-workforce-united-states-understanding-changes-1990

Children in day care not physically active because of many factors, study finds

2/2012

While children of all ages need physical activity to stay healthy, a recent study finds that a range of barriers prevent child care centers from offering such activities.

The three main barriers to physical activity in child care centers are injury concerns, financial constraints and a focus on academic programming, according to the study.

The findings are particularly troubling in light of rising childhood obesity rates and the fact that three-fourths of U.S. preschool-aged children spend time in child care centers. Published in the February issue of Pediatrics, the study was based on focus groups held with 49 child care providers from 34 centers in Cincinnati.

Source: American Public Health Association

Available at: http://thenationshealth.aphapublications.org/content/42/1/E1.full

Parents are the biggest obstacle to letting kids play, says study in Pediatrics

1/4/12

A new report on why children in day care are sedentary suggests that it’s not the care providers, but the parents, who are mostly to blame.

The study, “Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers,” will be published in the February issue of Pediatricsand was published online today.

It focused on childcare centers where, according to previous research, close to three-fourths of pre-school-aged America children are enrolled and where they spend only 2 to 3 percent of their time playing vigorously.

Researchers set out to find out why so little time was spent playing. They studied 34 racially and demographically diverse Cincinnati-area child-care centers and found three consistent obstacles to exercise.

Source: The Washington Post

Available at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-parenting/post/parents-are-the-biggest-obstacle-to-letting-kids-play-says-study-in-pediatrics/2012/01/02/gIQAeV96YP_blog.html?wprss=on-parenting

The Biting Project

We do a lot of work with infant and toddler biters and their victims, their teachers and their families in child development centers and family child care homes in and around Washington, DC.

It goes without saying that we wish the work didn’t exist – no one likes the actual biting.  But we recognize that biting is typical and that as long as any of us work with very young children, we’ll regularly face the challenge of biting.

Source: Foundations for Families

Available at: http://foundationsforfamilies.wordpress.com/the-biting-project/

Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012

7/20/11

This notice announces the annual adjustments to the national average payment rates for meals and snacks served in child care centers, outside-school-hours care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals and snacks served in day care homes; and the administrative reimbursement rates for sponsoring organizations of day care homes, to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index. Further adjustments are made to these rates to reflect the higher costs of providing meals in the States of Alaska and Hawaii. The adjustments contained in this notice are made on an annual basis each July, as required by the laws and regulations governing the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

Source: Federal Register

Source: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-20/html/2011-18257.htm