NOW HIRING: INTERNS (Obama Foundation)

The Obama Foundation is looking to hire a diverse cohort of passionate, mission-oriented, and qualified interns to serve in our Chicago and D.C. offices. This internship is open to current undergraduate and graduate students who are eligible to work in the United States.

We believe our interns will become some of the world’s most valuable leaders in varying capacities. Our hope is that this internship can provide interns with exposure to diverse models of leadership and practical work experience, especially for those who might not otherwise get them.

The Fall 2018 internship will run for 14 weeks beginning on September 4, 2018 and ending on December 7, 2018. For students on the quarter system, the internship will run from September 17, 2018 to December 21, 2018. Interns will be required to work 40 hours a week in either our Chicago or Washington, D.C. office.

The application opened on April 23, 2018 at 9AM CT and will close on May 14, 2018 at 5PM CT. We will not accept late applications.

If you are a law student interested in an internship in the Office of the General Counsel at the Obama Foundation for the Spring 2019 term, click here.

To ensure you get all the information you need in a timely manner, we encourage you to read our FAQ page before reaching out with questions.

What do interns do?

We are looking for interns who have excellent time management and organizational skills, are strong writers and researchers, and are eager to work in a fast-paced office environment. Interns will play a key role in providing departments at the Obama Foundation with the administrative, logistical, and operational assistance needed to execute their work. To learn more, check out our department descriptions here.

Who can apply?

Current full-time or part-time undergraduate and graduate students eligible to work in the United States are welcome to apply. The Foundation is committed to recruiting a diverse cohort of interns and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. The Foundation does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital or parental status, creed, national origin, citizenship status, disability, medical condition, pregnancy, ancestry, genetic information, military service, veteran status, or any other protected category under local, state, or federal law. We encourage qualified persons of all backgrounds to apply. If you are a qualified candidate with a disability, please contact us at interns@obama.org if you require a reasonable accommodation to complete this application.

The Foundation will provide interns with a stipend and reimbursements for a portion of the expenses directly related to their internship. Please note the Foundation will not provide relocation or housing assistance.

Completing the application

Please note that as you fill out your application, you will not be able to save your responses or return to them before submitting. If you’d like to take more than one session to work on your answers, please download the Application Worksheet to draft your application responses offline. Please note you will still have to enter your answers into the application before the deadline.

Source: The Obama Foundation

Available at: https://www.obama.org/internship/

Building Health Literate Organizations: A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change

A health literate health care organization is described as easier for people to use, and critical to delivering patient-centered care Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations. It supports patient-provider communication to improve health care quality, reduce errors, facilitate shared decision-making, and improve health outcomes.

This guidebook will help health care organizations of any size engage in organizational change to become health literate. It complements many excellent health literacy resources, helping you use them effectively and reliably. It includes background, resources, examples, and lessons learned to help build a health literate health care organization.

How to Use the Guidebook

The guidebook contains chapters and a case study on key health literacy development areas that intersect with the attributes of health literate health care organizations:

  • Engaging leadership
  • Preparing the workforce
  • The care environment
  • Involving populations served
  • Verbal communication
  • Reader-friendly materials

Each chapter answers these questions:

  • Why? Why do you need to address health literacy issues in this area? Why is it important?
  • What? What would success in this area look like? What are the target outcomes? Success may include changes to process, behavior, and attitudes, as well as health outcomes.
  • How? What tools, resources, and actions will you use to reach the target outcomes?

Start with any chapter. This is not a step-by-step process and there is not one correct starting point. Each chapter relates to the others, but each can stand alone. Each is necessary, but not sufficient, to bring about improvement. Start where you can begin to build a pattern of success. Build to work in more than one area at a time, eventually working in all key areas for results you can sustain.

Source: UnityPoint Health

Available at: http://www.unitypoint.org/health-literacy-guidebook.aspx

The Negative Effects of Instability on Child Development: Fact Sheet

9/26/2013

Children thrive in stable and nurturing environments where they have a routine and know what to expect. Yet a large number of children face instability at some point in their lives. They experience change in individual or family circumstances that is abrupt, involuntary, and/or in a negative direction. This fact sheet highlights key findings from a review of research in five areas of instability: family income, parental employment, family structure, housing, and the out-of-home contexts of school and child care. It also discusses recommendations for policy and practice to alleviate instability’s impact.

Source: Urban Institute

Available at: http://www.urban.org/publications/412908.html