National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day

 

Thursday, May 10, 2018

National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day is Thursday, May 10, 2018! This annual event raises awareness about the importance of children’s mental health and its impact on their healthy development.

Mental Health and Head Start

Early childhood mental health is a child’s growing capacity to experience, regulate, and express emotions. For children birth to 5 years of age, early childhood mental health is the same as social and emotional development. Head Start and Early Head Start have a long-standing partnership with mental health consultants and community professionals to promote the well-being of children, families, and staff in the program.

Awareness Day 2018

The national theme for Awareness Day 2018 is Partnering for Health and Hope Following Trauma. It will focus on the importance of an integrated approach to caring for the mental health needs of children and families who have experienced trauma. The Office of Head Start and the Office of Child Care will highlight best practices that support resilience for this year’s Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. Look for more details about opportunities to participate in the coming weeks.

More than 1,100 communities and 160 national collaborating organizations and federal programs will organize local Awareness Day activities and events around the country. Learn more about Awareness Day 2018 and how you and your community can get involved at https://www.samhsa.gov/children/awareness-day/2018.

Interested in planning an awareness day event at your program? Read about activities that communities across the country held for National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day 2017 at https://www.samhsa.gov/children/awareness-day/2017/activities.

Home Visitor Webinar Series: Socializations in Home-Based Programs

 

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
3–4 p.m. ET

Register Online Now!

Learn about the key role socializations play in home-based programs during this webinar. Monthly socializations offer both children and parents a chance to participate in group activities and interact with peers. Parents have many time demands so it can be challenging for them to participate. Join us to explore practices, activities, and strategies for offering engaging and effective socializations.

Topics for the webinar include:

  • The role of socializations in Head Start and Early Head Start home-based programs
  • Planning and implementing effective socializations
  • Frequently asked questions about socializations
  • Resources to support informative and engaging socializations

Target Audience

  • Home visiting program leaders
  • Home visitors
  • Regional T/TA staff who support home visiting programs

How to Register

Select the link to register: https://events-na2.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/951782966/en/events
/event/shared/1043467858/event_registration.html?sco-id=1099394061&_charset_=utf-8

Questions?

To learn more, contact the National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning at ecdtl@ecetta.info or (toll-free) 1-844-261-3752.

Home Visitor Webinar Series 2018 Calendar

Save the dates and mark your calendars! The Home Visitor Series webinars occur bi-monthly, from 3–4 p.m. ET:

  • Tuesday, June 12, 2018
  • Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018

To watch previous webinars in this series on-demand, visit https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/home-visitor-series.

Spotlights on Innovative Practices: Learning Management Systems— Sharing and Accessing Professional Development Resources

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:00–4:00 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time)

Register on line now.

This webinar will outline the benefits of developing a repository of course modules designed for early learning professionals and the ways in which administrators of state learning management systems (LMS) can join the effort. Listen to representatives from Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island as they discuss their respective LMSs, involvement with the repository, and a description of currently available materials. Join the webinar to see how your state might get involved! 

Who Should Participate

This webinar will be of interest to professional development system leaders, LMS administrators, and related staff members.

Viewing the Webinar

Select this Web link to register for the webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Questions

If you have questions, contact the National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning at ecdtl@ecetta.info or call (toll-free) at (844) 261-3752.

Upcoming Webinar Making a Difference: Maternal Depression

 

Date and Time: March 27, 2018 from 1:00 – 2:00 pm ET/12:00 – 1:00 pm CT/11:00 am – 12:00 pm MT/10:00 – 11:00 am PT

Description:  Maternal depression encompasses a range of conditions that can affect women at any time, and occurs most often during pregnancy and in the first year postpartum.  Having a depressed mother can have a negative impact on young children’s behavior and social/emotional development. Home visitors and early childhood professionals are often best positioned to support very young children and their families. Infant and early childhood mental health (IECMH) consultants can help home visitors and early care and education (ECE) providers learn the skills needed to support children and families who are experiencing the effects of maternal depression.

This webinar will explore the role of IECMH consultants in building staff capacity to identify maternal depression and support mothers and their young children through screening, support, and linkages to evidence-based prevention and treatment services. After attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Understand how maternal depression affects infants and toddlers.
  • Understand how IECMH consultants can help ECE providers and home visitors identify maternal depression in the families they serve.
  • Identify strategies to address maternal depression in ECE and home visiting settings.

Who Should Attend? This webinar is for program directors in infant and early childhood mental health consultation, early care and education, Early Head Start and Head Start, and home visiting, as well as federal, state, tribal, and community maternal and child health agency workers.

Please forward this invitation to anyone who may be interested in attending.

Presenters: 

  • Deborah Perry, Expert Mentor with the Center of Excellence for IECMHC, and Director of Research and Evaluation and a Research Professor at the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
  • Cathy Ayoub, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, and Director of Research and Evaluation at Brazelton Touchpoint Center
  • Debra Sosin, Program Manager for Family Connections at Brazelton Touchpoint Center

Please register by March 26, 2018 to receive webinar login information.

 

Register Here

 

The National Research Conference on Early Childhood

Title: NRCEC 2018 Document Header. - Description: NRCEC 2018.

The Administration for Children and Families presents the National Research Conference on Early Childhood.

June 25-27, 2018. Crystal Gateway Marriott. Arlington, VA.Registration is open!

We are pleased to invite you to attend the Administration for Children and Families’ 2018 National Research Conference on Early Childhood (NRCEC 2018). The conference will be held June 25–27, 2018, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA.

This conference, presented by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in conjunction with the Office of Head Start, is the leading venue for research on the development, education, and care of young children and their families and the policy and practice implications of their findings.

Please visit http://nrcec.net/ to register to attend the conference or for more information about the event. There is no cost to attend the conference, although all participants should register in advance through the conference website.

Please download, print, and share the registration flyer with colleagues!

 For hotel reservations, please contact the Crystal Gateway Marriott at (888) 421-1442 and provide the reservation attendant with the group name “NRCEC18” to receive the discounted room rate. Additionally, reservations can be made through the online reservation system. The group code for the discounted conference room rate will automatically be applied when you make your reservation on line. To receive this discounted rate, attendees must make reservations with the hotel by Wednesday, June 1, 2018. After this date, reservations will be accepted on a space-available basis and may be at a significantly higher rate.

 If you have any questions about the conference, please contact us at nrcec@impaqint.com.

 We look forward to seeing you in June!

The NRCEC 2018 Logistics Team
Office of Child Care
Administration for Children and Families
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Mary E. Switzer Building, Fourth Floor, MS 4425
330 C Street, S.W.
Washington, DC  20201
General office number: (202) 690-6782
Fax: (202) 690-5600
General email: occ@acf.hhs.gov
Website: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ

Child Care Aware® of America Symposium and Gala Celebrating Passion and Persistence. Igniting Possibilities

April 17-20, 2018

Marriott Marquis

Washington, DC

Child Care Aware® of America 30th Anniversary

Child Care Aware® of America is celebrating 30 years in the child care community at the Child Care Aware® of America Symposium 2018. The Symposium is the biennial event that brings together individuals from across the country come together to discuss the hottest topics of research, policy, and practices of interest to the early child care and education community.

This year has been extremely special as Child Care Aware® of America celebrated 30 years of growth and accomplishments. We are honored to have you help celebrate the closeout of Child Care Aware® of America’s 30th Anniversary.


Speakers/Program

We’re excited to announce that the digital version of the 2018 Symposium program is now available for download on the Child Care Aware® of America website. Download the PDF to browse the agenda and explore the sessions and speakers most relevant to your work.

 

Learn more about plenary topics that were covered during the 2016 Symposium here.


Who Should Attend?

The Symposium is the biennial event that brings together child care experts, Child Care Resource and Referral leaders and staff, child care providers, researchers, policymakers, parents, students, and anyone interested from across the country come together to discuss the hottest topics of research, policy, and practices of interest to the early child care and education community.


Why Should You Attend?

  1. Hear from Outstanding Experts in the Community
  2. Find Solutions
  3. Share Ideas and Learn From Others
  4. Put Faces to Names
  5. …and more!

Registration

Register Early and Save! Get the best rates when you register early. Bring your family, staff or become a Child Care Aware of America member and save even more.

Registration Rates Regular Rate On-Site
1/23/18 – 4/8/18 After 4/8/18
Member $529 $579
Non Member $599 $649

 

Register Now

Our Children’s Fear: Webinar on Immigration Policy’s Harmful Impacts on Children & Early Care and Education


Two new reports from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) document impacts of the current immigration context on our nation’s youngest children. Our findings are based on interviews and focus groups in 2017 with 150 early childhood educators and parents in six states—California, Georgia, Illinois, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. In this field work, CLASP found troubling effects on young children in immigrant families, including signs and behaviors of distress, as well as serious risks to young children’s healthy development. On this webinar, the report authors will discuss the study findings, including impacts on young children, their parents, and early childhood educators, and recommendations for stakeholders at all levels to safeguard the wellbeing of children in immigrant families.
Presenters:
  • Wendy Cervantes, Senior Policy Analyst, Immigration and Immigrant Families
  • Hannah Matthews, Director, Child Care and Early Education
  • Rebecca Ullrich, Policy Analyst, Child Care and Early Education

Register Here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1595127878189549058

Source: CLASP

The Perils of Confusing Performance Measurement with Program Evaluation

A group of researchers recently published a paper critiquing the child outcomes performance indicator for Part C and Part B 619. They also presented some of their thoughts in a recent webinar sponsored by the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD). The researchers’ critique is based on several faulty assumptions and consequently unfairly discredits the system for measuring child outcomes and the use of the data. Let’s look at our concerns with their critique.

First, the authors have confused performance measurement with program evaluation.

Their primary argument is that the child outcomes measurement requirement produces misleading information because it is based on a flawed evaluation design. The researchers’ critique wrongly assumes that the child outcomes indicator is designed as an evaluation. The child outcomes measurement is not a program evaluation; it is one performance indicator embedded within a larger performance measurement system that is required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). States report on a number of performance indicators that address compliance with federal regulations and program results. As such, these indicators yield information that supports program improvement and ongoing monitoring of program performance. Performance measurement systems are common in both the public (for example, Maternal and Child Health) and the private sector (for example, the Pew framework for home visiting). The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) implemented the child outcomes indicator in response to the Government Performance and Results Act which requires all federal agencies report on results being achieved by their programs. OSEP also uses the child outcomes indicator data to monitor states on results achieved, consistent with the strong emphasis in IDEA to improve results for children with disabilities.

The Government Accounting Office has produced a succinct summary that highlights some of the differences between the performance measurement and program evaluation. Performance measurement refers to ongoing monitoring and reporting of program accomplishments. Performance measures may address program activities, services and products, or results. The OSEP child outcomes indicator is a performance measure that addresses results. Examples of other results performance measures are teen pregnancy rates, percentage of babies born at low birth weight, 3rd grade reading scores, and high school graduation rates. In contrast, program evaluationsare periodic or one time studies usually conducted by experts external to the program and involve a more in depth look at a program’s performance. Impact evaluations are a particular type of program evaluation that determine the effect of a program by comparing the outcomes of program participation to what would have happened had the program not been provided.

Performance Measurement Compared to Program Evaluation

Feature Performance Measurement Program Evaluation
Data collected on a regular basis, e.g.,  annually Yes No
Usually conducted by experts to answer a specific question at a single point in time No Yes
Provides information about a program’s performance relative to targets or goals Yes Possibly
Provides ongoing information for program improvement Yes No
Can conclude unequivocally that the results observed were caused by the program No Yes, if well designed impact evaluation
Typically quite costly No Yes

A major difference between measuring outcomes in a performance measure system versus a program evaluation is that a well-designed impact evaluation is able to conclude unequivocally that the results observed were caused by the program. Performance measures cannot rule out alternative explanations for the results observed. Nevertheless, performance measurement data can be used for a variety of purposes including accountability, monitoring performance, and program improvement. Data on performance measures such as the Part C and Part B Section 619 child outcomes indicator can be used to track performance compared to a target or to compare results from one year to the next within programs or states. They can be used to identify state or local programs that could benefit from additional support to achieve better results. Comparing outcomes across states or programs should be done with an awareness that they might serve different population which could contribute to different outcomes. The solution to this is not to conclude that results data are useless or misleading but rather to interpret the results alongside other critical pieces of information such as the performance of children at entry to the program or the nature of the services received. Two of OSEP’s technical assistance centers, the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy) and the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (ECTA, have developed a variety of resources to support states in analyzing child outcomes data including looking at outcomes for subgroups to further understand what is contributing to the results observed. Just like tracking 3rd grade reading scores or the percentage of infants who are low birth weight, there is tremendous value in knowing how young children with disabilities are doing across programs and year after year.

Second, the authors incorrectly maintain that children who did not receive Part C services would show the same results on the child outcomes indicator as children who did.

The researchers’ claim that the results states are reporting to OSEP would be achieved even if no services had been provided rests on a flawed analysis of the ECLS-B data, a longitudinal study of children born in 2001. For their analysis, the authors identify a group of 24 months olds in the data set who they label as “Part C eligible children who did not receive Part C services.” These children

  • Received a low score on a shortened version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (27 items) administered at 9 months of age by a field data collector; and
  • Were reported by a parent when the child was 24 months old as not having received services to help with the child’s special needs.

Few would argue that the determination of eligibility for Part C could be replicated by a 27-item assessment administered by someone unfamiliar with infants and toddlers with disabilities. Furthermore, data from the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study show that very few children are identified as eligible for Part C based on developmental delay at 9 months of age. The first problem with the analysis is assuming all of these children would have been Part C eligible. The second problem is that it is impossible in this data set to reliably identify which children did and did not receive Part C services. Parents were asked a series of questions about services in general; they were not asked about Part C services. As we and others who have worked with national data collections have learned, parents are not good reporters of program participation for a variety of reasons. The only way to confirm participation in Part C services is to verify program participation which the study did not do. Given that children who received Part C services cannot be identified in the ECLS-B data, no one should be making conclusions about Part C participation based on this data set.

The authors also argue that a measurement phenomenon called “regression to the mean” explains why Part C and Part B 619 children showed improved performance after program participation. In essence this argument says that improvements seen in the functioning of the children are not real changes but are actually due to measurement error. One can acknowledge the reality of errors in assessment results but to maintain that measurement error is the sole or even a major explanation for the progress shown by children in Part C and Part B 619 programs is absurd.

Moving Forward

State Part C and 619 programs are required by IDEA to report on multiple performance indicators including child outcomes as part of a larger performance measurement system. The child outcomes indicator was developed with extensive stakeholder input in order to maximize its utility to local programs, state agencies, and the federal government. The process of building the infrastructure needed to collect and use child outcomes data has been complex which is why states have been working on it for over ten years. State agencies continue to identify and implement strategies for improving the data collection and use of the data. We know that the data collection processes are not perfect and more work needs to be undertaken to address data quality and other concerns. Building a national system for measuring the outcomes for young children with disabilities receiving IDEA services is a long-term undertaking that requires ongoing effort to make the process better. Disparaging the performance indicator and the data reported by states based on incorrect assumptions and flawed analyses is not productive. Instead, the field needs to collectively engage in ongoing dialogue around critical issues of data quality, data analysis, and appropriate use of the data based on an informed understanding of what the child outcomes indicator is and is not. Part C and Part B 619 state agencies and OSEP are on the forefront of collecting and using early childhood outcomes data to improve programs – which is exactly what performance measurement is intended to do.

Source: DaSy: The Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems

Available at: http://dasycenter.org/the-perils-of-confusing-performance-measurement-with-program-evaluation/ 

Picturing the Project Approach: Seeing How It Works for Teachers and Children in Practice

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 2 p.m. EST
Presented by: Dr. Sylvia Chard, Carmen A. Castillo and Yvonne Kogan

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. The authors of Picturing the Project Approach: Creative Explorations in Early Learning agree! In this unique webinar, you will have a rare opportunity to peek inside the life of The Project Approach in practice in real classrooms with real children and teachers featured in the book. The authors will share the power of projects through photographs of children from toddler to upper elementary ages in a school committed to high quality project work for more than a decade.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • The basics of the Project Approach
  • How the book can be used as a manual for teachers learning to engage their students in in-depth project work
  • How to lead teachers through the steps of incorporating the Project Approach in toddler, preschool or elementary classrooms

 

All sessions are 1.5 hour long, and include a brief announcement from our sponsor.

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Eastern Time.

To ensure you receive confirmation and reminder emails, add customercare@gotowebinar.com to your contacts list. If you do not receive your email confirmation, check your Spam or Junk mail folders in your email system.

Can’t participate in our webinars at the appointed time? Never fear! All of the webinars are recorded. To view the recording, simply register now and you will receive an email with a link to the recording when it is ready to be viewed. You can still download the certificate by watching the recording to the end when the certificate link is announced and displayed on the screen.

Only 1,000 people at one time can attend our webinars, but registration often tops 4,000. Only the first 1,000 people to click the link to attend the webinar will be able to get in. We start the webinars 30 minutes in advance of the start time. Arrive early to make sure you get in.

Please be advised that you will only be eligible for the great door prizes if you participate in the live session.

You can earn .2 CEUs for each webinar. The cost is $15 paid to University of Oklahoma online when you apply. Learn more here: Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from University of Oklahoma

See the schedule of upcoming webinars.

Register now

Submit Your Proposal to Provide Technical Assistance in Building Healthy Child Care & Communities

With the support of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), Child Care Aware® of America (CCAoA) is pleased to offer technical assistance (TA) to states on projects that support development or maintenance of quality child care settings that promote child health.CCAoA will select up to six (6) organizations to participate in this nine-month project, based on the strength of their applications. Please submit your proposals by 5 p.m. EST on Wednesday, February 28, 2018. 

During the Healthy Child Care, Healthy Communitiesproject period, the selected organization will determine which element of healthy child care will be its priority and will develop and implement a TA plan to achieve a goal articulated in this application. This goal must be a SMART goal—a goal that is Specific, Measurable, Assignable, Realistic and Time bound. We are interested in supporting statewide, regional, or local organizations with these initiatives through intensive TA that supports systemic changes to state or local policies or practices through one or a combination of the following levers for change:

  • Policy Development and Analysis
  • Advocacy
  • Research and Community-Informed Practices
  • Family and Community Engagement
  • Workforce Capacity Building Activities

Elements of a successful application include:

  • Participation in or building of a broad-based coalition focused on addressing health in child care settings.
  • Expressed interest in using data and data visualization to answer a research question or to solve a problem related to healthy child care settings.
  • A description of the types of support activities offered by CCAoA that it plans to use to support the equity-rooted policy and practice levers selected.
  • Preference will be given to applicants who are willing to enter into data partnership agreements with CCAoA,
  • Total number of points that may be obtained through evaluation criteria is equal to 100 points. Maximum point values for each question are listed.

Get further information about this opportunity here. Questions about the process or the submission may be addressed to Krista Scott, Senior Director of Child Care Health Policy at Child Care Aware® of America (CCAoA).

View the Proposal

Submit Your Proposal
(Which includes goals, requirements, scope of work and criteria)

 Deadline: February 28, 2018

Project Duration: March 15, 2018 to December 14, 2018